AdaCAD

AdaCAD is online software for design woven drafts for both frame and jacquard-style looms. It is still in an early testing phase, so if you would like to use it, we’d love your feedback.

To use AdaCAD visit: https://adacad-weaver.firebaseapp.com/

How to Use AdaCAD

The Inspiration for AdaCAD

Photo of the AdaCAD user interface

AdaCAD is a software platform that we built to support designing woven drafts and circuitry schematics in tandem. The tool is open-source and we are still working out the final design details so it is more broadly usable. Mainly, AdaCAD offers support for commonly used features in smart textiles weaving like multilayer weaves and viewing your weave in terms of the draft as well as the paths of the individual yarn types within the design.  Currently, it is designed to output files for weaving an a TC2 loom. Future updates include supports for harness looms.

Links:

Read Mikhaila’s Presentation from CHI 2019

In May 2019, Mikhaila presented AdaCAD at the annual conference on Human Computer Interaction (CHI) describing our web application for designing smart woven textiles. The work was a collaborative project between Mikhaila Friske, Shanel Wu, and Laura Devendorf. The conference talks were not recorded, but you can view the transcript of our presentation below or read the paper here. 

Continue reading AdaCAD

Overshot Weave Generator

I was in love with the fabric below and wanted to weave a similar pattern for myself. I didn’t have the tie up, but I did have the photo of the fabric, so I reverse engineered it. I found it really difficult to design the overall patterning of the stripes and tie ups at the same time so I wrote a processing script to allow me to more playfully make patterns with my keyboard, and have those generate my tie up. I released the code on GitHub so others could do the same.

Workshop: Weaving Climate Datascapes with Tali Weinberg

Artist Tali Weinberg will lead fifteen graduate students in a workshop materializing climate data in the form of woven tapestries. Participants will use basic weaving skills to produce tapestries by hand, experiment with ways to engage data while weaving, and reflect on the unique valences of weaving for engaging with and archiving climate data.  Participants will also use the Lab’s computer-controlled TC2 loom to create a collaborative tapestry representing climate data as well as personal recollections.
The NEST sponsored workshop will take place in the Unstable Design Lab at the ATLAS Institute and will guide participants through translating data into woven structures using hand and computer-controlled looms. Priority registration will be given to CU students and the public is encouraged to engage Tali’s existing Woven Datascapes at the CU Art Museum’s Documenting Change exhibition.
No prior weaving experience is required and all materials will be provided to participants.
What: Weaving Climate Datascapes
When: April 11-12, 10am – 5pm. 
Where: Unstable Design Lab, ATLAS 207
Here is some documentation of what we made!

Weaving a Smart Textile

We used a GoPro to capture each step in the process of weaving a smart textile and compiled roughly 6 weeks of work into this video. We show the two tapestries that emerged from this weave, one that didn’t work so well and the other that did (see force fabric post below). in both cases, we were attempting to weave structures that could be used to sense force and tigger color changes in response.

How to Weave a Sensing and Color Changing Fabric

This is a first prototype of a vision of a force-fabric. When integrated into a garment, this textile could capture and replay how your body made contact with other bodies in the world. Those bodies may be human, created through the experiences of hugs or holding children, but they may also be of nonhuman forces – heavy winds or couches pressed upon ones back. The concept is to think of ways technology can make us aware of how we are physically supporting and supported by other objects and environmental forces. It sees garments as a interesting surfaces of intersection between self and other.

 

We created this first textile by double weaving sections of color changing yarn (resistive heating wire painted with a mixture of thermochromic pigments that change at different temperatures) on the front face and then integrating conductive pads on the back or under layer of the fabric. We used a tapestry technique to integrate a second piece of conductive yarn along a segment of the warp above the touchpad such that when it is pressed it completes the circuit. The double weaving structure makes the connective “guts” invisible from the front. Thus, the textile does not invite you to touch and poke it (how would you know where to touch), it simply captures a “picture” of the different press regions.

Laura Devendorf wove the fabric on an Schacht 8-shaft Baby Wolf loom, warped at 20 ends per inch

Continue reading How to Weave a Sensing and Color Changing Fabric

String Figuring

string figure sensor in action

The string figure sensor is a concept or early prototype for a string-based sensor that can know something of its own shape. We created a proof of concept by knitting conductive thread and wool around a wire core, resulting in a semi-rigid loop that feels similar to a pipe cleaner in one’s hands. When someone plays with the loop, the crosses and knots created in it result in measurable changes in resistance. We take resistance measurements at five points along the length of the loop to create a resistance “signature” that correlates to various shapes or figures created with the string.

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Devendorf Awarded NSF-CRII Grant to Develop Smart Textiles Design Tools

The National Science Foundation has awarded Devendorf roughly $175K to develop new software for designing smart textiles. Smart textiles combine traditional processes of weaving or knitting with new materials that interface with digital technologies. The project will focus on weaving specifically, and proposes the development of a tool that bridges textile design with circuit design. Textiles and technology have a long and interwoven (pun intended) history. Through close collaborations with artists and engineers, we will develop the software to provide new functionality and outcomes while also imagining new modes of collaboration with machines (e.g. what new forms of engagement emerge with the fabrication of soft objects as opposed to rigid objects) and sustainable practices (e.g. in what ways might we un-weave to save on material waste). The funds will be used to support PhD students on this research and to equip the Unstable Design Lab with weaving equipment.