Categories
Experimental Weaving Residency Provocations

An Intro to Weave Structure for HCI

This publication includes a workbook on weave structure as well as a reflection on how HCI (Human-Computer Interaction) researchers might look to craft publications for inspiration when communicating the contribution of craft-oriented research. The workbook included in this publication is intended for HCI researchers to learn the fundamentals of weave structure in the context of weaving force sensors. The project emerged in collaboration between the lab and Experimental Weaver in Residence Etta Sandry and our shared interests in communicating the technicality and fundamentals of weaving to broad audiences.

You can read the full publication on Issuu, however, you will be able to download when it becomes officially published in June.

Citation:

Laura Devendorf, Sasha De Koninck, Etta Sandry. An Introduction to Weave Structure for HCI: A How-to and Reflection on Modes of Exchange. Forthcoming at DIS 2022.

Full Publication and Talk:

Coming in June 2022

Notes:

We will be reforming this activity book into an interactive format that’s linked with AdaCAD. Stay posted.

Categories
Provocations

Knitting Access

Wearables are often a primary means of collecting data on the body and in-situ. The data collected upon wearables can shape or record interactions in real-time, prompting practices like self-care and reflection. In this work, we became intrigued by textile structures that were non-digital, but in themselves “stateful”. We explored how these textile interfaces can fit meaningfully into the lives of people with disabilities as sensors and display. Our study revealed interesting practices that emerged for self-tracking that were qualitatively unique in their close relationship to the body and deeply physical modes of engagement. Our findings offer insights into (1) qualities of textile interfaces that are important to people with disabilities, (2) new forms of data that people found to be worthwhile in tracking, and (3) knitted interfaces for sensing and display.

Citation:
Annika Muhlbradt*, Gregory Whiting, Shaun Kane, Laura Devendorf. Knitting Access: Exploring Statful Textiles with People with Disabilities. Forthcoming at DIS 2022.

Full Text and Presentation:
coming in June 2022

Categories
Provocations

Biofoam as Interactive Material

Each new material developed opens a broader pallet of aesthetic and functional possibilities for designers. This paper demonstrates biofoam, a material that is water-soluble, biodegradable, and can be made conductive. We describe the material in detail: the process of making the material from scratch, the material’s fabrication into forms with hand-craft techniques, and present two HCI specific applications of the biofoam. The biofoam can be cooked, molded, layered, extruded, dissolved or recooked opening up possibilities to consider the entire life cycle of the material in the design process. We contribute design considerations to allow designers to “tune” the biofoam to the desired quality, as well as a characterization of many aspects of the biofoam such as compression, spring back time, water permeability, and electrical conductivity. Finally, we discuss the unique opportunities this material and its life cycle bring to the design and HCI communities.

Citation:
Eldy Lazaro Vasquez*, Netta Ofer, Shanel Wu*, Mary Etta West, Mirela Alistar, Laura Devendorf. Exploring Biofoam as a Material for Tangible Interaction. Forthcoming at ACM DIS 2022.

Full Paper and Presentation:
Will be released after the conference takes place in June.

Categories
AdaCAD Public Resources

Virtual AdaCAD Workshops

AdaCAD is a design tool we have developed for weave drafting. It specializes in generating and managing complex weaving structures that are most often used in Jacquard weaving. It is free, open-source, and under active development as a tool intended to bridge engineering and craft. Specifically, it uses the design paradigm of “generative design” within the context of weaving that allows one to dynamically generate and adjust weave structures programmatically such as the structures shown above (generated using the “random” structure generator where the weaver and specify the size and ration of raised/lowered heddles) and the resulting fabric on the right.

Want to play with it on your own? Follow any of these links:

Alternatively, you can sign up for a workshop to learn more.

We’re running an hour-long workshop to teach people how to use the tool and our next workshop will be April 1 @ 10am Mountain Time (9:00 PST, 12:00 EST, 18:00 CET). If you would like to join, send us your email and we’ll send you a zoom link.

Categories
Uncategorized

Etta Sandry is the 2022 Experimental Weaver in Residence

Dodecaweave, courtesy of Etta Sandry

After receiving 148 applications, forming a shortlist of 21 applicants, and then interviewing 5 finalists, we (the organizers and wonderful selection committee) are happy to announce that Etta Sandry will be our 2022 Experimental Weaver in Residence.

We chose Etta because her practice resonated strongly with our mission for the residency: to collaboratively produce techniques in response to specific engineering challenges. As a recently graduated MFA student at Concordia, Etta’s practice demonstrates an attention and commitment to sampling and exploring the unique structural formations of multi-layer weaving. We see her aesthetic strongly resonating the values of a craft-practice in its attention to and sharing of drafts, hand crafted mounts that invite engagement and play, and use of bold colors of wool and cotton. It was this aesthetic and attention to documentation that attracted us the most, helping us to conceive of the samples we might create as deeply resonant with craft and practice-based methodologies as opposed to the synthetic feel of prototypes concerning the “future.” Ultimately, we saw this aligning with the arguments made after our lest residency to the field of human-computer interaction. Namely, that when it comes to innovation practices, technologists could more strongly look to craftspeople as stewards of material knowledge and technique and to see them as equally as technical as the bits and electrons that make up engineering practices.

Stay posted for more updates from the residency, set to take place early 2022 and for future calls for 2023 and 2024 artists in residence. Based on the amazing advice of our selection committee, we will also public a directory of experimental weavers compiled from our residency applications and collaborators working in this space and a series of public virtual talks in 2022. Stay tuned. In the meantime, we have published all shortlist applicants, finalists and committee members who have provided permission below.

This program has been funded by the National Science Foundation under grant # 1943109.

2022 Residency Finalists

Jessy Lu, jessylu.com, @lu_jue
Jessy Lu is an artist whose work examines the relationship between textiles, computation, and femininity.

Hexagonal Cellular Symmetry, 2020, monofilament, silk, stainless steel. Image: Melanie Olde

Melanie Olde, melanieolde.com, @melanie_olde
Inspired by biomimetics, Melanie Olde is an Australian-based researcher and weaver, who investigates movement and sensory experience in three-dimensional cloth.

Victoria Manganiello, victoriamanganiello.com, @victoriamanganiello
Victoria Manganiello is an artist, designer, educator, and organizer who uses weaving and textiles to make objects, facilitate experiences, and tell stories that explore how craft intersects with technology, gender, and food.

2022 Shortlisted Applicants

Ana Mosquera Duran, www.anamosquera.com, @anacaribu
Ana Mosquera is a Venezuelan artist based in Philadelphia whose work revolves around digital data collection and the creation of simple methods of analysis that interrogate our daily use of technology.

David van Buskirk, dvbart-design.com, @dvbart_design
David van Buskirk is a textile designer, weaver and fiber artist. I collaborate with the loom, be it a 20 harness compu-dobby or a primitive weighted warp to explore technical and artistic possibilities inherent in structure and materials.

Kathryn Walters 2021

Kathryn Walters, kmwalters.com, @kw.textiles
Kathryn Walters is a PhD student in Smart Textile Design at the Swedish School of Textiles, with a focus on transformative woven textiles, exploring the behaviour of textiles as complex systems with responsive properties.

Kristina D. Aas, kristina-aas.com,
Kristina D. Aas is a textile artist and educator based in Bergen, Norway. Her main focus is jacquard weaving on TC-2 and industrial looms.

Laura Splan, laurasplan.com, @laurasplan
Laura Splan is an interdisciplinary artist who creates embodied interactions, tactile experiences and sensory encounters to connect materialities of science to familiar domains of the everyday.

Maija Järviniemi, jarviniemi.fi, @mollimaija
Maija Järviniemi is a Finnish designer who’s practice sails from experimental weaving to material development and concept creation. Vivid colors and boundary pushing weaving techniques are characteristic to her work.

Nathalie Miebach

Nathalie Miebach, nathaliemiebach.com, @miebachsculpture
Nathalie Miebach translates science data related to weather into woven sculptures and musical scores, using basket weaving as her main method of translation.

Raven Saga
I am an interdisciplinary designer based in India. I love getting my hands on everything being it materials, softwares, interactions, etc. I explore beyond.

image credit: Mercedes Jelinek

Sasha Baskin, sashabaskin.com, @sashbask
Sasha Baskin is a US-based weaver and lacemaker who makes work about the intersection of math, textiles, and digital culture.

Tatsuki Hayama, tomoe.me, @hayamatomoe
Tatsuki Hayama is a Japan-based mathematician working on complex geometry. He is also interested in applying math to computer graphics, digital fabrication, and art.

© Yun-Hsuan Chang 2019

Yun-Hsuan Chang, yunhsuanchang.com, @yunhsuan.c.textiles
Yun-Hsuan Chang is a Taiwanese designer-maker who creates innovative woven textiles and uses intimate visual language to carry messages and tell unique stories.

Zoe Romano, zoeromano.eu, @zoescope_
Zoe Romano is a Italy-based independent researcher and craftivist working at the intersection between e-textiles, digital fabrication and care for social empowerment.

2022 Selection Committee

Kristina Andersen,
Future Everyday, Eindhoven University of Technology
website

Matt Bethancourt,
Director, Whaaat!? Lab for Games and Experimental Interactions, 
website

Sarah Rosalena Brady,
Assistant Professor of Computational Craft at UCSB, website

Annet Couwenberg,
Fiber and Material Studies, MICA,
website

Annapurna Mamidipudi,
Scholar and Craft Researcher,
website

Christy Matson,
Artist and Weaver,
website

Pam Meadows,
Curator, Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art
website

Vernelle A. A. Noel,
Assistant Professor, University of Florida,
website

Jane Patrick,
Creative Director, Schacht Spindle Company,
website

Michael Rivera,
PhD Candidate, Carnegie Mellon University,
website

Categories
Provocations

Objects of Care

A few years of workshops on textiles, combined with an obsession with Sister Corita Kent, has given rise to a card game that we call “Objects of Care”. This card game walks plays through a design exercise reflecting on objects that provide “care” to them, and then creatively interpreting the care in those objects in different ways.

If you are interested in getting a deck or learning more about the project, please email us at unstabledesignlab@gmail.com.

Sasha will be presenting this project at the Design Research Society conference in July 2022.

Citation:

Sasha de Koninck, Laura Devendorf. Objects of Care. Forthcoming Design Research Society Biannual Conference 2022.

Upcoming:

Stay tuned for a link that allows you to upload ideas generated from the game here.

Categories
Experimental Weaving Residency

2022 Experimental Weaving Residency Call for Entries

Experimental Weaving Residency
Spring 2022 : Consider Everything an Experiment 

Part of the ATLAS Institute at the University of Colorado Boulder, the Unstable Design Lab is hosting its second experimental weaving residency with the goal of developing new techniques and open-source resources that can co-evolve fiber arts and engineering practice. The chosen resident will work with the Unstable Design Lab, as well as researchers from the University of Colorado, to create a series of samples inspired by challenges currently faced by engineering researchers. For example, shape weaving techniques for creating form-fitting and/or compression garments for counter-pressure spacesuits, integration of power harvesting diodes, compostable or easily reusable textile structures for zero-waste manufacturing, or structures that dynamically fold and unfold to support mechanical structures or soft robotics (to name a few, but not all, possible spaces for experimentation). Applicants should be open-minded, curious, and above all deeply knowledgeable about woven structures and their behaviors. No knowledge of computer science, electronics, or engineering is required for participation. 

Timeline

Application DeadlineSept 15, 2021
Notification to Selected ApplicantNovember 1, 2021
Residency Dates12 weeks between Jan 15-May 15

Resources

The resources available to the resident include a desk in the Unstable Design Lab, priority access to a TC2 digital jacquard loom (3W warped at 60 ends per inch), access to other weaving, spinning and knitting equipment in the lab, access to traditional and novel weaving materials, programming support for some custom software needs, access to the fabrication facilities at the ATLAS Institute, access to motion-capture and high-end audio equipment in the B2 Center for the Media Art and Performance, and an exhibition space to showcase work at the end of the residency (also at the B2). While we can provide instructions for getting started on the TC2, the artist is ultimately responsible for the design and production of their swatches—there is no technician devoted to realizing the work on the equipment.

Expectations

The resident will be expected to work at least 30 hours per week with the lab members and collaborators evolving concepts that address the artist’s interests as well as the engineering teams’ needs. The selected resident must be willing to share any techniques they develop as open-source resources to both the collaborators and public more broadly, including producing necessary documentation for others to replicate their techniques. To facilitate the exploration of projects of mutual interest, the organizers will schedule meetings with various researchers during the first week of the residency to better understand their needs and challenges when it comes to integrating textile structures into their research. The resident, then, will be able to select the challenges that most interest them to further explore, sharing their findings with the research teams as they develop.

Timing, Housing, Stipend

Stipend*$9520 USD
Airfare Reimbursement$450 USD
Materials**$500 USD
* the stipend will be taxed by the US government and this may have significant impact for international applicants
** materials budget does not go directly to artist, but is to be spent by the lab during the residency on supplies determined by the artist.

The residency scheduling is flexible but should total 12 weeks should take place between January and May 2022 in Boulder, Colorado. The resident will receive $9520 as a stipend, $450 towards airfare to and from Boulder, and a materials budget of $500 to be spend during the residency. The artist will be responsible for locating housing and travel to and from Boulder, Colorado. International applicants are welcome to apply but should note that the stipend will be lower due to taxes taken by the US government on international workers. 

The funding for this residency has been generously provided by the National Science Foundation under a grant looking to better understand how craftspeople can be integrated into engineering research. As such the selected resident will be asked to provide feedback and data about their experience to better understand how universities can support such collaborations in the future. The funding will allow us to host this residency again in 2023 and 2024.

International Applicants

We welcome international applications. If you are of non-US citizenship, please make note that the stipend will be particularly affected by US taxes on international workers as well as some fees for VISA processing in your country of citizenship. As we reach the later stages of the application process, we may use this information to provide you with more specifics on the taxes you may incur as well as verify with the host university that you would be eligible to work within the institution. We can provide flexibility in the residency dates to support applicants who may be facing additional challenges obtaining a VISA and/or traveling to the US due to current current restrictions given COVID. For more information on the particular program through which we host residents, visit: https://www.colorado.edu/isss/cu-departments/hiringhosting-international-students-scholars/international-scholars-j-h-e-pr/j-1-3

Organizers

Laura Devendorf (she/her),
Director of the Unstable Design Lab
Assistant Professor, ATLAS Institute
& Dept. of Information Science
website

Steven Frost
Faculty Director of the
B2 Center for Media Arts & Performance
website

Allison Anderson
Assistant Professor, Smead Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences
website

Selection Committee

The selection committee and organizers will work together will determine the finalists. The organizers will ultimately select the chosen resident.

Kristina Andersen,
Future Everyday, Eindhoven University of Technology
website

Matt Bethancourt,
Director, Whaaat!? Lab for Games and Experimental Interactions, 
website

Sarah Rosalena Brady,
Assistant Professor of Computational Craft at UCSB, website

Annet Couwenberg,
Fiber and Material Studies, MICA,
website

Annapurna Mamidipudi,
Scholar and Craft Researcher,
website

Christy Matson,
Artist and Weaver,
website

Pam Meadows,
Curator, Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art
website

Vernelle A. A. Noel,
Assistant Professor, University of Florida,
website

Jane Patrick,
Creative Director, Schacht Spindle Company,
website

Michael Rivera,
PhD Candidate, Carnegie Mellon University,
website

History 

The first iteration of this residency ran for a 6-week period in summer 2019 with support for the center for craft materials-based research grant. The resident, Sandra Wirtanen, and collaborator, Katya Arquilla, focused on the development of techniques for weaving dry electrodes for physiological monitoring.

Collaboration Team

As a collaborator in the Unstable Design Lab you will be working among artists and researchers across many domains of research. You would share immediate lab space with the students and faculty listed on the people page. Additionally, we will be working closely with Ella Schauss (a PhD student working with Prof. Anderson) and Michael Rivera (who will be a post-doctoral researcher at the lab during Spring 2022).

Application

To apply for the residency, please fill out the form below. Our selection criteria will be determined by your approach to experimentation, aesthetic of your work, and the demonstration of techniques that you employ in the work so please use the images and statements to provide details to those ends. Details about how you document and share your work will also help your application.

applications are now closed

Categories
Provocations

Unlearning the Garment from the Body

Categories
Open Source Public Resources

Prototyping Smart Textiles – A Reader

In support of our newly developed class, we found ourselves writing a reader to explain different techniques, material sourcing and structures of textiles that could be leveraged for so-called “smart” applications (but if you read our intro, you see we get into a bit more complexity on that). This has been authored by Laura Devendorf, Sasha De Koninck and Steven Frost but it is available via Github so you can contribute as well if you so wish. You can find the complete book at the link below:

Categories
Open Source Public Resources

Soft Object Open Curriculum

We developed a course and curriculum for teaching textile structures to an audience of students interested in engineering and physical prototyping. We have released this course, as well as our materials lists, kits, and assignments, as an open education resource here: https://unstable.design/soft-object/_book/